Such workers can give smaller towns a middle-class core, with the spending power to attract service industries – and with them, still more jobs

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The Wall Street Journal: Satellite Communications Help Transcriptionists in India to Work While Doctors in US Sleep.
July 31, 2015

Such workers can give smaller towns a middle-class core, with the spending power to attract service industries – and with them, still more jobs

NewsweekIf it happens, it will be companies like Selectronic Equipment and Services that deserve the credit. Selectronic employs 250 young men and women, who work in an obscure suburb of New Delhi, doing overnight transcription of patient reports for American doctors. Veer Sagar, the company president, says his costs are between 25 and 35 percent lower than an American service’s. And he thinks his business, whose current sales are about $750,000 a year, is just in its infancy. ‘I could see us extending the service to billing, payment follow-ups, bed management, inventory control,’ he says.”
– Newsweek, september 27, 1999. (Growing Smartly – page 38)

 

“Cultural fusion is another common feature. Since these companies are outposts of American or British firms and adhere to their standards, they must master not only unfamiliar terms but also the mind-set behind them. At Selectronic, a six-month training course in American medical terminology is supplemented with group viewing of Chicago Hope and ER, accompanied by take-away pizza. Yet in some ways the atmosphere remains resolutely Indian. These dataworkers are not rootless part-timers, as their American equivalents might be. Many expect their employers to treat them like family members, providing transport to and from work, company cricket games and jobs for life. Indian law makes it hard to do anything less.”

TheEco“Selectronic recruits from its lower-middle class Delhi neighborhood. Its employees may speak English less fluently then GE’s, but Selectronic compensates with rigorous training and a checking process that vets every one of the 1.3m lines of transcription the company produces monthly”.
The Economist, january 16th-22nd 1999. (Spice up your services-page 63)

Review“India’s vast diaspora of professionals working in the U.S. and other developed countries may also be an advantage. About 32,000 Indian doctors practice in America, creating a network of contracts for Indian medical-transcription services, a high-growth field. Delhi-based Selectronic Equipment & Services employs 300 workers to transcribe patient histories from voice recordings sent by U.S. doctors over the internet. Within eight hours, text versions are back in physicians’ hands, says Selectronic President Veer Sagar.”
Review, september 2nd 1999. (Catching The Bus – page 11)

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